Home GENERAL Dr. King’ori Biography and Background Information

Dr. King’ori Biography and Background Information

by Louis

NTV Dr. King’ori has made a name for himself hosting The wicked edition show at NTV. We are looking at Dr. Kingori’s biography, education background, cv, salary, wife, tribe, net worth, and contacts.

Dr. King’ori Early Life Background

Raised in Blue Valley, Embu, in a family of five, 26-year-old Dr. Kingori has made a name for himself as the host of NTV’s The Wicked Edition. The father of one is already dominating the comedy space and is planning to take it further.

According to our snitch, Dr. Kingori sold this idea to both Obinna and Otoyo the men behind the offside show, and thus the popularity of Kinyanjui the reporter was born.

School Background

Is he a real professor? Kingori is not a real doctor but uses it a script name to spice up comedy

I ventured into professional comedy in 2010, which is when I realized I could get paid for it. I used to tell my friends that I would have my TV show, but most of them didn’t take me seriously. A few believed in me and supported me. Back then in Embu, I was playing set-book characters.

Things To Know About Dr. King’ori

  1. My favorite combination of food is ugali and maziwa mala.
  2. My favorite drink is milk. I take milk only on days ending with ‘y’ (laughs)
  3. The last time I cried was in 2012 when a girl who I thought was humble took advantage of me. I was very hurt since we were very close.
  4. I rarely smile, which is funny because I’m a comedian.

Monthly Salary

He earns close to 300k -500k per month but other side hustles

Dr. Kingori had problems with financial issues and was struggling to make a name for himself in the local Kenyan comedy industry and had to come with a different style and that is why he kept the identity of Kinyanjui the guesswork specialist a secret from many people including even his family.

Also, Read – Lona of Maria Citizen TV Biography and Background

Dr. King’ori Interview Part One

KenyaBuzz: Describe yourself in three words.

Dr. King’ori: Three words?? You want me to describe myself in just three words!? Why can’t it be three sentences? Okay, I’d say I’m Cautious, Inquisitive, and Curious.

KenyaBuzz: How did you pitch The Wicked Edition as a show?

Dr. Kingori: First, the idea was to pitch it as a segment on The Trend with Larry Madowo. Linus Kaikai (Managing Editor at Nation Media Group) saw it and thought it could be a good show on its own since the audience enjoyed the short segment on The Trend.

KenyaBuzz: What is the one thing people don’t know about you?

Dr. King’ori: Well they don’t know my government names and that is something I like keeping under wraps since it’s part of the mystery. Also, I am not a real doctor nor a Daktari wa miti (herbalist), but I provide the best medicine that real doctors don’t have – and that is humor.

My dad is my only fan back home, probably because everyone else is just as funny (laughs). He calls me by my stage name, Dr. Kingori. I called my mum when I first appeared in a newspaper back in 2014, expecting her to be proud or excited. All she asked was, “You couldn’t find a better belt?”

Relationship and Dating Background

He is a father of one but we are yet  to know the baby mama

Are you dating? – I am the chairman of the team dry spell and I’m not relinquishing that position. I’m not in a relationship right now, but I am raising my young daughter as a single father. She is the lady in my life right now and she is the greatest joy of my life.

Dr. King'ori

Dr. King’ori Interview Part Two

I was called a comedian in class three and this made me very angry.

They called me ‘Makhokha’, the Vioja Mahakamani comedian with a rugged look. My classmates nominated me whenever a speaker or comedian was needed from the crowd. I was never confident about the jokes I told at that time. So I would tell the joke to the person seated next to me, who would share it with the class.

I ventured into professional comedy in 2010, which is when I realized I could get paid for it. I used to tell my friends that I would have my TV show, but most of them didn’t take me seriously. A few believed in me and supported me. Back then in Embu, I was playing set-book characters.

Then I traveled to Nairobi, straight to Nation Centre, to pitch my idea. I was told to first record a pilot, which is a stand-alone episode of a television series that is used to sell a show to a television network. I wondered where the money to do that would come from, as getting money for fare to Nairobi and back home was hard. I had to come up with other ideas. My next step was to get a sponsor. I decided to approach Yu Mobile and sent an email to the company’s manager trying to sell my ideas. She has never replied.

My neighbor’s friends offered me some money to write jokes for them for a GBS competition they were to take part in. I agreed. I wrote the script and they came back asking if I would like to take part in the competition since the minimum number of participants had gone up. I said Yes. That was the first time I was on a television show, in May 2010. JB Masanduku and I won the competition.

I did stand-ups and club shows from then until Kenya Kona approached me. I worked at Kenya Kona for a year.

 

Kazungu Matano, also known as Captain Otoyo, liked the way I packaged my comedy. He asked me to write for Offside Show on NTV. That was in 2013. We did 69 episodes, where I also built a voice character called Kinyanjui. Additionally, I did Churchill Show.

Larry Madowo also saw something in me. He asked: “Why are you fixed on writing? Do you know how many forms of comedy there are?” He decided to show me. He downloaded all comedy shows he knew of during the week. We would then go to his place after The Trend on Fridays to watch them. Larry did his part in showing me all these other forms of comedy. I then put out my ideas to Kevin Gitau, The Trend’s producer.

The Wicked Edition was a theory for almost a year before I called my friends, the initial members of the team: Paul Ogolla and Nicholas Okwach. We planned and decided to air it first on The Trend, on a day that was my birthday, coincidentally. People loved it and The Wicked Edition was born.

Some people think we copied Trevor Noah’s Daily Show idea, but that means these people watch only that show. If you watch America’s late-night shows, we’d be told we copied all American shows. That said, I love being compared with such shows because that means we are good.

The Wicked Edition’s secret is simply telling the truth but in a satirical way. Our first guest was Police Spokesman Charles Owino. We still think he was our breakthrough. What our guests like is that we do our research well. Getting a guest for the show is not easy. We don’t bring just anyone. The show is systematic, meaning they must be relevant and tied to the discussion of the day.

I have to cover up for any time I haven’t worked in a day. If I spend four hours, say, hanging out with my daughter or friends, I will work four hours in the night. That’s how my mind is set.

The job is not as easy. It’s not an 8-5 job, but the pressure is more. I can get to work at 5 am and leave at 11 pm, the same way I can get in at 10 pm and leave at 10 am the next day. The good thing with creativity is that I can leave work whenever my brain can’t work further.

If I was to do the show alone, I would need 28 hours in a day (laughs). But I credit it all to my team members. They help a great deal.

I have only four favorite hang-out joints, which happen to be my house and three of my friends’ houses. I don’t drink or smoke, neither does my closest circle. The best we can do with our free time is to entertain ourselves with stories.

Larry Madowo is my favorite celebrity, though he does not consider himself popular. 

My dad is my only fan back home, probably because everyone else is just as funny (laughs). He calls me by my stage name, Dr. King’ori. I called my mum when I first appeared in a newspaper back in 2014, expecting her to be proud or excited. All she asked was, “You couldn’t find a better belt?”

Related Posts